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Hoosier Pattern Produces Molds for Cadillac Intake Manifold

When Cory Taulbert of Taulbert Chassis Components reached out to Hoosier Pattern to work be apart of this project, we didn’t realize how cool the results would be! Hoosier Pattern’s 3D sand printers created molds for an intake manifold that ended up being a part of a Cadillac V8 rebuild.

Bill Ganahl (South City Rod and Custom) is currently building a hot rod for client Mark Warrick.  The 1936 Ford 3 window coupe hosts an immense amount of subtle custom touches, something South City Rod and Custom is known for.  Under the hood sits a 1955 Cadillac V8.

 

Engine conversions were very common in the early days of hot rodding, as it offered the owner an easy way to get more power as Detroit rolled out better engines.  In parallel, the aftermarket quickly supported the new engines with custom camshafts, multiple carburetor intakes, and even supercharger systems.

A company called Supecharger Company of Turin (SCoT) sold superchargers of various displacements for popular engines, but more importantly, produced the intake manifolds that allowed everything to be bolted together.  Fast forward to today, some of these parts are still around but the original limited-production has made those parts extremely rare today.

Back to Mark’s 1936 Ford – he wanted to put a SCoT supercharger on the Cadillac V8.  Bill had the tall task of locating an original SCoT intake to put the package together, but there were none to be found (that were for sale anyway).  Bill turned to a friend, Cory Taulbert, to see what they could come up with.

Cory suggested that they make a new intake manifold.  This would allow them to custom tailor it to Mark’s car, as well as give Mark the exclusivity to unique “one-off” part.  Cory offered up the CAD services and got to work designing a new intake manifold, with inspiration from the original SCoT intake manifold.

When it came time to actually make it, Cory reached out to Hoosier Pattern.  He had recently seen a friend working on a 1920’s Packard Indy Car engine block, that was created from scratch.  Hoosier Pattern 3D printed the molds, so it was clear that it was the place to go to.

At Hoosier, Todd Yoder worked with the 3D model to develop the 3D printed molds.  The molds were then shipped to Crystyl Engineering in Piqua, OH, where an aluminum casting was poured and heated treated.  To finished off the casting, Tooling Science Inc in Maple Grove, MN finish machined the interfacing surfaces and flanges.

 

It’s always very exciting to see a project that we were a part of come together in the end and even better when we get to share these projects with the rest of the industry. The possibilities with the 3D sand printers at Hoosier Pattern are truly endless. Need a quote for a project that requires 3D printed sand? Go here.

Posted in: 3D Printing, General