REGARDING COVID-19: Hoosier Pattern has decided to limit face to face meetings with customers and visitors and will be heavily utilizing the use of teleconferencing and web meetings with customers until further notice. It is our goal to not only keep our employees safe but to keep visitors safe by limiting contact.
Work Life News

Hoosier Pattern Celebrates 23 Years in Business!

2020 has definitely had its ups and downs. Although there is one silver lining worth celebrating, Hoosier Pattern is turning 23 years old! Despite these obstacles we faced, Hoosier Pattern remained a crucial part of the supply chain and adjusted to new policies and procedures during a global pandemic. We’ve expanded the shop and added new technology. We had to lean on each other and give each of us encouragement during hard times.

Being an essential business during a global pandemic has been nothing short of a challenge. After February, the COVID outbreak halted every in-person trade show. All of our company outings were canceled, and life inside the shop had to be immediately adjusted.

Face-to-face meetings, tours, and customer visits were wiped off the calendar. Overnight we began heavily utilizing the use of web conferences. We implemented temperature stations as well as extra sanitizing and cleaning procedures.

Today, we’re cautiously starting to open our doors to a few visitors and have resumed some face-to-face meetings. However, we’re still continuing to take every necessary precaution to ensure that everyone remains safe. In the future, we’re looking forward to further opening our doors for students and customers to tour our facility while staying connected with our patrons through our tradeshow events.

Looking back at 2020, the inside of the shop has continued to evolve. In January, we finalized the installation of our fourth 3D sand printer inside the shop, and we’re grateful for the extra capacity it has given us to take on more jobs. We added a new Doosan DNM 6700 to our CNC shop floor, and we developed a 360 virtual tour on our website.

Over the years, Hoosier Pattern’s success or secret sauce relies on our expertly-trained team that consistently serves our customer’s needs despite the difficult times they face. Our employees overcame adversity this year.  They dealt with new protocols, changes in shifts and hours, limited contact with each other, canceled employee outings, and grieved the unexpected loss of a co-worker together.

Our employees dealt with all of those curveballs, but we never let our guard down. When it came to the quality of work or relationships with our customers, every team member rose to the occasion

In retrospect, 2020 has been filled with highs and lows. It was a year full of learning and challenging ourselves to think outside the box like never before. We are thankful to celebrate another anniversary and look forward to what the future has in store for us. 

Remembering Lucinda (Cindy) Wyss

There are good days at work and there are bad days at work.

On occasion, there are days that just don't make sense. 

The Hoosier Pattern family experienced one of those days that don't make sense when we unexpectedly lost one of our own last week. Cindy Wyss worked part-time and had just celebrated her two year anniversary at Hoosier Pattern. She was one half of our shop maintenance team and was part of the reason visitors always said "it's so clean in here!" when they toured our facility. Navigating being an essential part of the supply chain during the COVID-19 pandemic has been difficult to say the least. We doubled, if not tripled, our sanitizing and cleaning procedures. Cindy had no problem coming in for some extra hours every week to help with the increase in cleaning the facility. She never once complained about wiping down the same surface multiple times a day to ensure that we stayed as germ-free as possible. 

Cindy's memory will always be honored by the Hoosier Pattern family as well as within our facility. Cindy worked part-time at another local business, Ritter's Flower Shop, for over 40 years. She's made hundreds of crafts and floral arrangements throughout the years for this community. One of Cindy's final crafts at the flower shop was a wreath that just so happened to have flowers with Hoosier Pattern's signature colors - blue and green. We knew right away that this special wreath belonged on our wall in memory of Cindy and as a way for employees to always remember her and her giving spirit. Hoosier Pattern will also be donating every year to a charity in memory of Cindy. This year we will be donating to Woodcrest Retirement Community as a way to honor Cindy's love for helping the elderly. Cindy also worked a third part-time job with home health care. She truly was one of the hardest working people in our building and she will be greatly missed. 

 

Cindy was not only a hard worker, but she was also a friend to many people here. She was a loyal wife, mother, daughter, sister, and aunt. Cindy worked three part-time jobs to support her family and because of that, she did not have life insurance. Hoosier Pattern believes in leaning on each other in times of grief and sorrow as well as being a helping hand whenever and wherever you can.

Cindy,

We know that you would not be a fan of us talking about how great you are and would insist that we didn't gather as a group for lunch today to remember you. Some of us even think that the flood that happened in our break room this morning was a sign from you telling us that we aren't allowed to have the group lunch... or that our floors aren't clean enough. Either way, the thoughts of you gave us a small laugh and made us feel like you are still with us. We are positive that you would want us to push forward and keep living a life with a kind heart that serves others - and so that's what we will do. You will be greatly missed but we know heaven gained one of the good ones. 

Love, 
Your Hoosier Pattern Family

Click here to donate to the GoFundMe account to help Cindy's family with her funeral expenses. 

   

Meet Our Summer Intern: Clay

Every year Hoosier Pattern enjoys taking in internships, externships, or job shadowers, and this summer we had Clay Barlow in the shop with us! Clay has been with us all summer throughout different areas of the shop. Learn more about Clay's experience in his own words below. 

  

Age:
20

School/Grade Level: 
Purdue University - West Lafayette, Junior in the fall of 2020 and I am majoring in Materials Science and Engineering

What made you seek out Hoosier Pattern as a place to work at for the summer?
It was an opportunity to work within my area of interest for the first time. Not only that, but it looked like and proved to be true that Hoosier Pattern is a place that does a lot of things and does them all well. Also, they are consistently innovating and are leading their industry. I was excited long before I arrived and I wasn't disappointed. 

What types of things did you do at Hoosier Pattern?
I've been able to do a lot and got experience within every department over the course of my internship. My main role was to work on improving the 3D plastic printing capabilities, but I also worked with machining, sand printing, and on other projects.

What did you enjoy about working at Hoosier Pattern? 
I enjoyed that there is never a dull day and that each day, each hour, you will be working on something different. Not only that, but it seems like Hoosier Pattern is focused on continuously improving all parts of the company and to be a part of that type of innovation is awesome. Last but not least, it's a very friendly, almost family-like, atmosphere. You have a lot of responsibility and freedom to get things done and if you happen to mess up, the people here are nothing but supportive and helpful to fix the problem. 

What were some memorable projects you got to work on and participate in? 
3D printer optimization: I got to dial in the printer and slice parameters to begin producing carbon fiber infused plastic parts. I also got to work on integrating soluble support into our parts to improve support removal and surface quality. 

Centrifugal ISO-Finishing Inquiry: I produced a part in 4 materials to explore a new 

Casting made from a sand printed mold: I got to design apart from a print and then had the mold sand printed and got to pour molten aluminum into it to create a casting. (pictured above)

What do you want to do as a career? DO you think that working at Hoosier Pattern during the summer will help you decide on what you want to do as a career?
I am hoping to land in the foundry or at least in the wider metals production industry. working at Hoosier Pattern has already helped me with career decisions by solidifying it in my mind and allowing me to gain an extracurricular real-life experience within the industry. I also got to see another side of the casting world. 

Other than the job itself, what kind of things has Hoosier Pattern taught you?
While at Hoosier Pattern, I've learned a lot about being a better professional, engineer, and person. Outside of the job skills, I learned a lot about managing multiple projects at once and making sure goals get met in a timely manner. I learned better ways to communicate, especially across the company and outside of the company. just in talking with the others in my workspace, I got info on professional networking, on the foundry industry, and on things completely outside of work like general life skills and advice. 

Outside of work, what do you enjoy doing? What organizations are you involved in at school? Do you play sports? 
I enjoy cooking, spending time outside, tinkering, and making stuff and hanging out with friends and family. At school, I'm mainly involved as a leader in volunteering and professional organizations including Purdue's chapters of American Foundry Society and Material Advantage. as for sports, I'll play football or basketball with friends or run and lift also.

Clay's last day at Hoosier Pattern will be this Friday, August 14th. Good luck at Purdue this fall, Clay! 
 

Meet Ian and Colin! | High Schoolers in Manufacturing


It's already been a busy summer here at HPI and it's only the middle of June! Every year, HPI looks into bringing high school aged kids to job shadow or actually be hired in to help out where needed in the shop to get a feel for what the manufacturing industry is like. Along with getting hands on experience, these summer positions also give these students a taste of what having a job in the "real" world is like by teaching them soft skills such as showing up to work on time every day and being a part of a team. This year's summer employees come from Adams Central High School and Norwell High School. Everyone meet Colin Rittmeyer and Ian Smith!

 

 

Colin Rittmeyer
Norwell/Senior

What made you seek out HPI as a place to work at for the summer?

My father works here and I’ve worked here before.

What types of things do you do at HPI?
I work in the sand room – extracting job boxes, cleaning cores and packing them to be shipped to foundries.

What do you enjoy about working at HPI?
I really enjoy the relaxed work environment.

What do you want to do as a career? Do you think that working at HPI during the summer will help you decide on what you want to do as a career?
I’ve been planning on going into the Marine Corps which I had decided to do 4 years ago.

Other than the job itself, what kind of things has HPI taught you?
How important attention to detail is.

Outside of work, what do you enjoy doing? What organizations are you involved in at school? Do you play sports? 
Cooking, playing baseball and PT with the Marine Corps recruitment program.

 

 

Ian Smith
Adams Central/Junior

What made you seek out HPI as a place to work at for the summer?
I have seen all the things they do for their employees and I hope to make a career out of this. 

What types of things do you do at HPI?
I do a lot of mold cleaning and then packing them to be shipped to foundries.

What do you enjoy about working at HPI?
Getting a half day on Friday. 

What do you want to do as a career? Do you think that working at HPI during the summer will help you decide on what you want to do as a career?
I would like a career in machining or mold making and after working here I feel like my choice to do that has been justified.

Other than the job itself, what kind of things has HPI taught you?
Respect, honesty and work ethic

Outside of work, what do you enjoy doing? What organizations are you involved in at school? Do you play sports? 
I wrestle and play football. Last year I was part of the skills USA contest for machining and I placed fourth in the state for Milling Specialist. 

 

While we understand the appeal of summer vacation for high school aged kids, we think it is really impressive that these students have seeked out local opportunities to make some extra cash. It is admirable,  shows a good work ethic and we look forward to showing these students how we do it here at HPI. Welcome to the HPI family for the summer, Colin and Ian! 

 

HPI hires new employee via Signing Day

The Adams Wells Manufacturing Alliance (AWMA) held a signing day event for local students that have been enrolled in a work-based learning program in high school and have decided to work full time for these businesses after graduating. Connor Ray came into Hoosier Pattern last summer and inquired about a job. HPI was impressed with his motivation and initiative to plan for his future after high school and hired him. He went to school half day then worked half day and lastnight at the signing day event, HPI signed him as a full time employee. Connor was one of 10 local graduates that signed to work full time with area businesses. Every signee received a $150 signing bonus from the AWMA. Read about the full list of signees here.

Connor will graduate from Heritage High School on Sunday and we look forward to a future with him here at HPI. Congratulations to Connor as well as the rest of the Class of 2019!

  

Read more about the AWMA and what they do here.

New Year; New Equipment

We are one month into 2019 and things have already been happening here at Hoosier Pattern. 2018 was a crazy year and we are looking forward to what 2019 has in store, not only for us as a company, but for the industry as a whole. Last year was a year of expansion for HPI. In July, we added a third sand printer as well as expanded the sand cleaning/packing  area giving us room to expand increased printed product from these sand printers.  

In the fall of 2018, HPI added 2 Johnford bridge mills to our list of machinery. Both bridge mills have the same travel size of 83”x 70” The size capacity of these bridge mills allow us to take on larger jobs that once had to be turned away.


Journeyman Patternmaker, Phillip Bauman and Apprentice Patternmaker Kyle Rittmeyer, collaborating on a project infront of a Johnford bridge mill

We also announced last year that we were installing a Kuka™ robotic milling cell. This robotic milling cell allows us to machine foundry sand molds or plastic patterns. As of now we are able to mill sizes up to 60x100”. Training on the robotic milling cell for our workforce will take place in early February to help educate our team to communicate with the robot. This new technology will give our customers more tools to assist them to bring their finished goods to market sooner.  Be on the lookout for updates regarding the robotic milling cell.
 
The new robotic milling cell in the shop 

Lastly, we added a new Creaform™ laser scanner to our list of technology. New training for this scanner has been underway to enhance our knowledge and better provide quality inspections of our machined products.


The new Creaform™ laser scanner in the quality room ready to be put to work on some practice scans

 

Customers have always been the driving force behind our business and these purchases are no different. We look forward to what 2019 holds and seeing how our capabilities are expanded with these additions. Staying on the cutting edge of technology is what makes Hoosier Pattern different and sets us apart from the rest. We take pride in welcoming "out of the box" concepts and making sure that every job leaves our doors with the highest standard of quality. We know these new technologies will help us continue to keep doing great things here inside the walls of Hoosier Pattern.

Summer Intern: Lucas Juengel

With the school year back in full swing, we wanted to give some recognition to our summer intern, Lucas! Lucas spent the summer at HPI shadowing different departments and even desiging his own part. Lucas is 18 and now a Senior at Bellmont High School. Get to know a little more about Lucas and his experience at HPI below.

 

  

How did you get connected with HPI? Did you pick it or were you placed here?
I applied to Connexus online and HPI chose me to interview and then picked me to be their summer intern

Did you have an interest in what HPI does before you  interned here? Do you have more of an interest now?
Yes, I was interested in CNC machining and 3D printing and now that I have learned as much as I could in 6 weeks about them, I am more interested in HPI. 

What type of things did you do at HPI?
I shadowed someone from each area and I learned a little bit about everything. I got to design and make 2 different projects as well. 

What did you enjoy the most?
I enjoyed making a plate with a tractor on it and then designing a scaled down break rotor that I got to pour and cast. 

Did you learn some new skills during this internship?
I learned how to work a new software and also how to melt down and pour molten metal. 

How would you describe the atmosphere?
Everyone was friendly and more than willing to answer all of my questions.

Did it change/inspire any future career plans?
It inspired me to keep continuing on the path of engineering.

Would you recommend an internship or job shadowing to other students?
Yes, because I learned a ton of things this summer through the program and it gave me a taste of what the real world is like. 

 

HPI enjoyed having you this summer and we are confident with your willingness to learn and grow that you are going to do great things! Have a great school year!

HPI’s Newest Journeyman Patternmaker!

Jim Geimer has technically been a Journeyman Patternmaker since May of 2018 but after a couple delays, HPI finally got to present him with his official state certificate that certifies him as an official Journeyman Patternmaker! Jim started at Hoosier Pattern in February of 2012 and officially entered the apprenticeship program in January of 2013. Over the next 5 years, he logged 10,000 working hours along with taking the required 12 classes at Ivy Tech Community College. He wrapped up his apprenticeship in early 2018 and as of this morning, his certificate is officially hanging on our wall! 

All Hoosier Pattern employees as well as Jim's wife, Stephanie, were there for the presentation. 

  

Congratulations Jim! We are so proud of you and can't wait to see the great work you do in the future. 

Coming Summer 2018

Hoosier Pattern prides itself on being innovative and consistently raising the bar within the industry while maintaining the level of quality they are known for. Back in 2013, Hoosier was the first top service center to own and operate their own 3D sand printer in the United States. Coming Summer 2018, Hoosier will be the only service provider to own and operate two 3D sand printers under their roof along with maintaining a 3rd printer in their facility as well.

 

Customers are the driving force behind everything Hoosier does and this expansion is no different. This will allow Hoosier to take on jobs that once had to be turned away due to capacity restrictions. The current turnaround time for printed sand of 10 days will remain standard; however the possibility to turn printed parts around sooner -if needed- for customers has greatly increased.

On top of the addition of the 3rd sand printer in house, Hoosier has recently added a 5-axis machining center as well as 3 Doosan DNM 650’s to the machining side of the shop. All of these additions allow Hoosier to maintain current customers as well as take on new customers with more complex projects.

Exciting things are happening at HPI. Stay Tuned!

Local Students Pour Castings Using 3D Printed Molds

Recently, the Area 18 Precision Machining class at South Adams High School poured their own castings from 3D printed molds printed with HPI’s sand printers.

The South Adams / Area 18 Precision Machining classes prepare students for going straight into their machining careers. Several of our employees at HPI are graduates of this class. Past graduates include Tony Uhrick, Ryan Seddlemeyer, Phillip Bauman, Jon Dathe, and Kyle Rittmeyer. Advisory board members from Hoosier Pattern include Keith Gerber and Ryan Seddelmeyer, and Todd Yoder.

The graduates of this class can earn both NIMS (National Institute of Metalworking skills) certifications and college credit, but most importantly, they are ready to begin their careers in a real-world machining/manufacturing company.

The South Adams Precision Machining class begins the first year with an introduction to shop safety, shop math, and basic hand tools. While the first “bench work” project is starting, each student gets an introduction to CNC (computer numerical controlled) machining by using a CAM system to design and program a polished aluminum nameplate for their lockers. After that, it is back to the manual machines to get a good machining foundation on manual lathes, mills and surface grinders. By the end of the first year, the students begin to get more experience programming and setting up basic parts on their 6 CNC machines. (3 of the machines were donated by HPI).

During the second year class, students completely design, engineer and manufacture a complex assembly from scratch. This year, the student designed a double acting steam engine with variable timing. The students worked together as a team to produce a working model in SolidEdge of their own design. Once the design was finalized, the students created industry level blueprints for each part along with inspection sheets. After that, the students will take all that paperwork they created as a team and machine all the parts individually and leave with a working engine by the end of the school year. The column/crankshaft support is the part that the students worked with HPI to have sand printed molds made for.

Back in January, Mr. Jerod Dailey’s class poured their castings using HPI’s molds. Lars, Mason, Chandler, Keaton, Kegan and Bailey got some real hands on training in handling molten aluminum as well as how to safely pour it and produce a quality casting. Below are some pictures of the class as well as some of the student’s thoughts on the project.

 

1st and 2nd are of the parts they poured – there are two parts to a pour, each one will make a column for the 17-18 engine project that the students designed. Once they are cut apart, there are still 4 holes and 2 bearing bores that will be machined.

 

The material that they melted that was donated by FCC Adams and they used about 8 pieces for this first pour. 4 more pours to go plus any green sand casting they do. The class took their scrap parts and cut them into 4 pieces to fit in the crucible

 

Last picture are the molds that Hoosier Pattern made for us with the 3D Sand Printer

 

“It was really interesting to pour molten aluminum. It was neat that at really high temperatures that metal will flow as easy or easier then water. I thought it was going to be pretty light weight but when all the aluminum was melted it was actually pretty heavy. So thank you for the material and for donating the molds to us so that we could experience casting for the first time."

Keaton A. (Adams Central)

 

“Pouring our molds was very interesting and fun because we got to see the aluminum melt and turn into liquid form which I have never seen. This was my first time I have ever poured aluminum and I think it would be cool to do more often. Thank you for donating the molds to the class so we could have the opportunity to pour our own part for our class project.”

Chandler S. (Adams Central)

 

“Thank you for the molds that you made for us. This was the first time I have poured aluminum and it was one of the coolest experiences I have had in this class. I was surprised by how easily it poured into the mold. I hope I can defiantly do this again sometime.”

Lars I. (South Adams)